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15/16 CTS 2 (Contextual and Theoretical Studies 2 )

 

General

  • The aim of this unit is to develop your broader knowledge and understanding of the historical, social, practical, theoretical and cultural developments of contemporary visual culture. You will have the opportunity to further contextualise various aspects of art and design theory in its broadest sense by focusing upon specific Options and by writing a Dissertation Proposal.This unit provides a programme of work based on two Option subjects from the field of art, design and visual culture selected for study in Terms 1 and 2 and the production of a Thesis proposal in Term 3.

    You will engage in critical reading, research methods seminars, writing workshops and further study related to key concepts, debates and theories. This focus on acquiring skills in research and critical analysis will enable you to formulate and develop the dissertation proposal pursued at the end of the unit. The comprehensive number of option choices will allow you to both extend your knowledge in relation to your main studio specialisms and to broaden your knowledge in the wider field of art and design.

    Throughout the year the Options and Thesis Proposal sessions will be supported by Research Methods Seminars that will introduce you to diverse elements of research as well as to a variety of research methods and methodologies. These seminars will also help you appreciate the interdisciplinary context within which processes of designing and theorising design take place and help you to research and write at BA level. It will allow you to recognise and use interdisciplinary approaches in design and cultural analysis through texts, objects, practices. The seminars will engage with a diversity of key terms and concepts and show how they are used in research and in practice.

  • Timetables

    CTS Term 1 Options Timetable LCC

    File: 1
  • Graphic Design Theories

     Critical Graphic Theories

    +

    This option is aimed at students who wish to broaden their understanding of the historical and theoretical developments that have shaped the fields of graphic design and typography in the 20th Century, in order to further consider what may lie ahead for both professions in years to come.

  • Graphic Narratives

    Graphic Narratives

    +

    This option will focus on the use of graphic narrative in a range of contexts from comic books and graphic novels to storyboards and animation. We will examine the emergence of comic books and animation in the early 20th Century and trace these origins through to the synthesis of these media in 21st Century e-books

  • Photographic Philosophies

     Photographic Philosophies

    +

    This is an option designed to introduce and explore the subject of photography. In this option we will, through a series of lectures and seminars, investigate the emergence of the medium of photography from a historical context, through the historical conception of the possibility of photography  to its emergence and development as a significant new visual medium and latterly through to it becoming considered a fine art in its own right

  • Moving Images

    Moving Images

    +

    Since the invention of the cinématographe at the end of the 19th century, a striking number of thinkers have taken a serious philosophical interest (sometimes exhibited as anxiety) in the ability to create and project moving photographic images. This option will look closely at some of the key theories and concepts that make us think differently and moving images.

  • Urban Futures

    Urban Futures 2

    Our urban future demands innovation. Cities are at the front‑line in responding to global challenges of resource scarcity, climate change, unemployment, and ageing populations. While these are big challenges, they also present major new business and innovation opportunities.

  • Branding Spaces

    Branding Spaces

    +

    Branding spaces can include flagship and concept stores; virtual, temporary and event spaces; theme parks and museums; and more broadly tourist destinations, regions and cities. We consider the growth in interdisciplinarity where products, graphics, and interiors are combined to create immersive, interactive and experiential environments for staging brands in space.

  • Public Arts & Performance Studies (Term 1 Only)

    Public Arts

    +

    This option engages with what happens when art and design intervenes in the public domain. Site-specific art emerged in the late 1960s in reaction to the growing commodification of art and the prevailing ideals of art’s autonomy and universality. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, as site-specific art intersected with land art, process art, performance art, conceptual art, installation art, institutional critique, community-based art, and public art, its creators insisted on the inseparability of the work and its context.

    Performance is a genre in which art is presented “live,” usually by the artist but sometimes with collaborators or performers. It has had a role in avant-garde art throughout the 20th century, playing an important part in anarchic movements such as Futurism, Dada and Pussy Riot. This option interrogates performativity and the body in space and society.

  • Exhibition Studies

    Exhibition Studies

    +

    The aim of this option is to help you develop a critical understanding of the histories, theories and practices of exhibition design and curation and how it relates to your own area of practice. You will be introduced to the ways in which permanent and temporary exhibitions are designed, developed, implemented and evaluated in a range of public and private spaces including museums, galleries, shops, offices, online and in the street.

  • Digital Disruptions

    Digital Disruptions

    +

    Digital has changed the game. You need new ways to deal with digital disruption and a digital transformation strategy. Digital is disrupting how we work — affecting our programming and curation, our organisational models, our marketing practice and our relationship with audiences.

  • Networked Societies

    Networked Societies

    +

    The World Wide Web has become part of our culture and everyday life. But how has cyberspace changed the way we relate to ourselves and others? How do we cope with friendship, leisure, work, love, politics and conflict in a networked digital age? Do machines make us think differently? Does technology come ‘pre-coded’ with its own values? And how are technologies for the body changing our sensory experience of the world?

  • Computer Game Cultures

    Computer Cultures

    +

    From Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage through to Alan Turing and on to Bill Gates and Steve Jobs the computer has defined an age of our increasing reliance on computers and the new opportunities they have created. This option will explore the impact the rise of the computer has had on our society and our thisnking about the world and its futures.

     

  • Feminist Visions

    Feminist Visions

    +

    This option introduces students, almost all of whom will be involved in some kind of image-making in their student and professional lives, to key concepts of ‘the gaze’ and theories of representation and sexual objectification. The course aims to provide students with the key critical skills to analyse elements of contemporary popular culture, noting how the gaze replicates and reinforces power relations, particularly in regard to race and gender.

  • Forecasting Futures

    Forecasting Futures

    +

    Futures studies (also called futurology) is the study of postulating possible, probable, and preferable futures and the worldviews and myths that underlie them. There is a debate as to whether this discipline is an art or science. In general, it can be considered as a branch of the social sciences and parallel to the field of history.

  • Creative Enterprises (Term 1 Only)

    Creative Enterprises

    +

    “There is an urgent need to find new development, pathways that encourage creativity and innovation in the pursuit of inclusive, equitable and sustainable growth and development.” This unit introduces critical ways of thinking about the sectors commonly referred to as ‘cultural’ and ‘creative industry’ and the type of activity that we might call ‘creative work’.

  • Critical Cultural Meanings (Term 1 Only)

    Critical Cultural Meanings

    +

    This option engages you in the deconstruction and reconstruction of the complex relationships, between Design, Culture(s) and the production of meaning. The option focuses on how Design and theories of Design, in all their manifestations, can help create, and at the same time critically interrogate the societies we live in today.

  • Branding Choices

    Branding Choices

    +

    This option allows you to explore diverse and creative approaches to branding and gain valuable insights into all aspects of the subject from its historical, social, cultural, corporate and commercial contexts. A key aspect of contemporary practice is the dialogue between the brand and the audience and this will provide a focus to our studies.

     

  • Fashion Cultures

    Fashion Cultures

    +

    This option will be a dynamic in-depth exploration of theoretical and methodological perspectives will give you an insight into the history of fashion and how it relates to social and cultural theory.

  • Sound Cultures (Term 2 Only)

    Sound Cultures

    +

    It is rarely recognised that one of the most distinctive features of the modern world is its sonic environment. Since the late nineteenth century we have for the first time been able to store and mass-circulate sound, and produced a sonic environment that is louder, more dense and more heterogeneous than at any previous time. This option is and investigation into al this sonic.

  • Experience Design (Term 1 Only)

    Experience Design

    +

    Experience, interaction, design methods, design process, people, this unit will look at participation, in all its varieties, as the generative and critical concept allows us to examine the projects as a part of a coherent, responsive movement, allied with other emerging movements in DIY culture and participatory art.

  • Critical Sustainability & Global Design (Term 2 Only)

    Critical Sustainability

    +

    This option analyses prevalent forms of sustainability discourse in the UK and around the world: eco-oriented sustainabilities, vernacular sustainabilities, justice-oriented sustainabilities, and market-oriented sustainabilities. It sketches the history of these discourses, argues that the meaning of sustainability depends on whose sustainability is being discussed, and lays out a framework for critical sustainability studies. We will examine how design has been, and continues to be, presented and discussed globally. A range of historical design contexts will be explored in detail and provide you with a framework to firmly grasp different modes of contemporary practice in a range of different cultures.

  • Design Activism

    Design Activism

    +

    This option looks at the rich history of resistance, revolt, revolution and dissent from an aesthetic point of view. We will look at creative practices of protest and resistance developed by artists/designers, protest groups, social movements and ordinary people, both historical and contemporary. We will consider the social, political and cultural contexts that produced these experiments (the many -isms people struggle against, such as racism, sexism, imperialism, capitalism, …).

  • Writing Design (Term 2 Only)

    Writing Design

    +

    This option will be an exploration into the many exciting and exquisite worlds of critical stylish academic writing.  It will take you on a journey through a multitude of Hows and Whys where you will end being a more confident and nuanced writer and art and design and your own work.

  • Options Introduction

    Aims

    The aim of this unit is to develop your broader knowledge and understanding of the historical, social, practical, theoretical and cultural developments of contemporary visual culture. You will have the opportunity to further contextualise various aspects of art and design theory in its broadest sense by focusing upon specific Options and by writing a Dissertation Proposal.

    Indicative Content

    This unit provides a programme of work based on two option subjects from the field of art, design and visual culture selected for study in Terms 1 and 2 and the production of a dissertation proposal in Term 3.

    You will engage in critical reading, research methods seminars, writing workshops and further study related to key concepts, debates and theories. This focus on acquiring skills in research and critical analysis will enable you to formulate and develop the dissertation proposal pursued at the end of the unit. The comprehensive number of option choices will allow you to both extend your knowledge in relation to your main studio specialisms and to broaden your knowledge in the wider field of art and design.

    Throughout the year the Options and Dissertation Proposal sessions will be supported by Research Methods Seminars that will introduce you to diverse elements of research as well as to a variety of research methods and methodologies. These seminars will also help you appreciate the interdisciplinary context within which processes of designing and theorising design take place and help you to research and write at BA level. It will allow you to recognise and use interdisciplinary approaches in design and cultural analysis through texts, objects, practices. The seminars will engage with a diversity of key terms and concepts and show how they are used in research and in practice.

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